Whose turn? The strange case of Golden Grove Street and Darlington Road

(April 21, 2020) See update below

At the intersection of Darlington Road and Golden Grove Street, adjacent to the University of Sydney campus (the route to King Street for those of us in Darlington), drivers seem to believe that the turn (Golden Grove to Darlington, Darlington to Golden Grove) is a through road, and honk at pedestrians safely and legally crossing the street on the south side Darlington (East to West from campus to Prince’s Highway).

The NSW Road Rules of course require drivers to yield to pedestrians crossing the street they are entering, but not the street they are exiting, because of course they do.

Darlington is one-way until that point, there is no stop sign on Golden Grove, and the sign on Golden Grove says “Left Turn Only” (which though it shows a “turn”, also implies a clear right-of-way aside from us pesky pedestrians).

This is a turn legally, and in any case, drivers are supposed to not hit pedestrians in the road, but they seem to view it as if we are making a mid-block crossing and in the wrong since Darlington east of here has a Yield sign.

A marked crosswalk across Golden Grove and across Darlington (ideally raised like a Wombat, but anything really) would help remind drivers of the appropriate safe position here.

Who should this be addressed to?

 

Screen Shot 2020-02-27 at 13.43.07
A Google Streetview. Drivers think the turn is not a turn.

 

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An aerial photo
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A map
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Should the red car stop? Does it know whether it should stop? Will it stop? Is it obliged to stop?

 

Update April 21, 2020:

After some inquiries and buck passing, the following information was passed along:

  1. The City of Sydney agrees this is a problem and has proposed a solution [raised pedestrian crossings at the intersection] which has been approved by Council and Traffic Committee
  2. Many many people were canvassed – approx 1100 letters and of those 19 people responded. The initial proposal was for a parklet at the intersection and to restrict through movements but maintain access ( slightly differently from current arrangements) local residents opposed , and Uni of Sydney specially objected because they have an access to a waste access area off this street that they did not want to change. So intersection is changing but no parklet
  3. The new scheme – above was approved, however is not funded until 2021 -22 and perhaps even later given financial arrangements. ( not so good news)

I hope this is built sooner rather than later, though I am sure people are occupied with other matters.

Published by David M Levinson

Prof. David Levinson teaches at the School of Civil Engineering at the University of Sydney, where he leads TransportLab and the Transport Engineering group.

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